Nome da Atividade
RUMINANT METABOLISM AND NUTRITION
CÓDIGO
01240076
Carga Horária
51 horas
Tipo de Atividade
DISCIPLINA
Periodicidade
Semestral
Modalidade
PRESENCIAL
Unidade responsável
CARGA HORÁRIA OBRIGATÓRIA
03
CARGA HORÁRIA TEÓRICA
03
CRÉDITOS
3
FREQUÊNCIA APROVAÇÃO
75%

Ementa

The overall intent of this course is to discuss the intricate and dynamic regulatory mechanisms that modulate intermediary metabolism in ruminants (sheep and cattle). It is designed to serve as a link between the “basic biochemical science” (metabolic pathways, etc.) and “applied sciences” relevant to livestock production. Objectives: Discuss and interact ruminant nutrition with metabolism, the performance of new approaches and technologies, as well as, feed strategies, metabolic disease and efficiency.
A successful student in this course will be able to:
• Compare and contrast how dietary feed is converted to body structures, energy, and energy stores within ruminants and non-ruminants.
• Describe how energy stores are used when needed under various physiological conditions (exercise, fasting, starvation, pregnancy, and lactation).
•Discuss how metabolic processes are regulated to meet the body's need under maintenance, growth, and productive metabolic conditions. Instructional Methods: This course will be team-taught by 2 faculty members and lectures will be the basis of instruction. Students are expected to read the reading assignments before class to encourage discussion during lectures. Guest lecturers will contribute in areas of their expertise.

Objetivos

Objetivo Geral:

O objetivo geral da disciplina é discutir o complexo e dinâmico mecanismo regulador que modula o metabolismo intermediário,
nutrição e manejo nutricional em ruminantes.

Conteúdo Programático

Bibliografia

Bibliografia Básica:

  • Chapinal, N., et al. The association of serum metabolites in the transition period with milk production and early-lactation reproductive performance. Journal of Dairy Science, v. 3, p.178-188. 2012.
  • Grummer R.R. Nutritional and management strategies for the prevention of fatty liver in dairy cattle. The Veterinary Journal, 2008.
  • Harper’s Illustrated Biochemistry (28th Ed.). 2009. R. K. Murry, D. A. Bender, K. M. Botham, P. J. Kennelly, V. W. Rodwell, and P A. Weil. The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Hess, B. W.; et al. Nutritional controls of beef cow reproduction. Journal of Animal Science, v.83 p.E90-E106, 2005.
  • Knobil and Neill's Physiology of Reproduction, Fourth Edition, Academic Press, 2014. 2684p.
  • Ingvarsten, K.L. Feeding- and management-related diseases in the transition cow: Physiological adaptations around calving and strategies to reduce feeding-related diseases. Animal Feed Science and Technology. v. 126, p. 175-213. 2006.
  • Leroith D. et al. Molecular and cellular aspects of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor. Endoc. Rev. 16(2):143-63, 1995.

Bibliografia Complementar:

  • Louhio H., et al. The effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II on human ovarian follicles in long-term culture. Mol. Hum. Reprod. 6(8):694-698, 2000.
  • Lucy, M.C. Fertility in high-producing dairy cows: reasons for declive and corrective strategies for sustainable improvement. Reprod Suppl. 64, 237-254, 2007.
  • Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle. 1996. 7th Rev. Ed. National Research Council. National Academy Press. Washington, DC.
  • Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle. 2001. 7th Rev. Ed., National Research Council. National Academy Press. Washington, DC.
  • Vernon, R.L. Lipid metabolism during lactation: a review of adipose tissue-liver interactions and the development of fatty liver Journal of Dairy Research.72 460–469

Página gerada em 06/07/2022 22:04:37 (consulta levou 0.049377s)